From Our Blog

Digital Promise: Learning Jewish, Online

By Chana German on June 20th, 2017

This is part 3 of the series in eJewishPhilanthropy, Continuing Conversations on Leveraging Educational Technology to Advance Jewish Learning. The series is a project of Jewish Funders Network, the Jim Joseph Foundation, and the William Davidson Foundation. For an in-depth look at opportunities in Jewish Ed Tech and digital engagement, read Smart Money: Recommendations for an Educational Technology and Digital Engagement Investment Strategy. Later this year, Jewish Funders Network will launch a new website to help advance the field of Jewish educational technology. A century ago, when my bubbe sat in her fifth grade classroom in a Chicago public school, with 30+ classmates sitting row after row, listening to her teacher lecture, it would have been hard, probably ...More

Procuring the Proper Software, Hardware and Teacher Training for Successful Educational Technology Integration – A Funder’s Perspective

By Amy Amiel on June 7th, 2017

This is part 1 of the series in eJewishPhilanthropy, Continuing Conversations on Leveraging Educational Technology to Advance Jewish Learning. The series is a project of Jewish Funders Network, the Jim Joseph Foundation, and the William Davidson Foundation. For an in-depth look at opportunities in Jewish Ed Tech and digital engagement, read Smart Money: Recommendations for an Educational Technology and Digital Engagement Investment Strategy. Later this year, Jewish Funders Network will launch a new website to help advance the field of Jewish educational technology. When you care about successful technology integration in your local Jewish school, what is the most effective way to provide support? For today’s school leadership and school or community funders, the pathway forward ...More

Jewish Learning: Between Passion and Career

By Erin Dreyfuss on August 8th, 2016

Editor's Note: The Jim Joseph Foundation supports Jewish educator training programs at institutions of higher education around the country. These programs help develop educators and education leaders with the skills to succeed in a variety of settings. This blog--the fourth in a series of reflections from participants in these training programs (read the firstsecond, and third blogs)--is from Erin Dreyfuss, a graduate of the Program in Experiential Education and Jewish Cultural Arts at The George Washington University. She is the Development Associate at the Edlavitch DC Jewish Community Center. Almost all of my Jewish education has been experiential. As a convert to Judaism, I have learned Judaism and created a Jewish identity by doing, celebrating, schmoozing, ...More

Hiddur: Deepening Jewish Experiences at Summer Camp

By Joel Einleger, Aaron Saxe, and Aimee Weiss on May 16th, 2016

This blog on Hiddur ran originally in eJewishPhilanthropy Think for a moment of nearly any activity you associate with Jewish camp. Whatever comes to mind, chances are that the experience is communal, engaging, and fun. Now, more camps increasingly recognize that any camp experience can also be a quality Jewish experience for their campers and staff – if designed in a thoughtful, intentional way. Over the last decade, multiple investments by different funders have focused on developing the Jewish experience at camp, and camps now have a wide range of professional development and training opportunities with this focus available to their seasonal and year-round staff. The field’s enthusiastic reception of these offerings has shown a steady appetite for learning ...More

The Rich Landscape of Summer Jewish Learning

By Chip Edelsberg on August 14th, 2015

Last month, I shared reflections on our special Board Meeting in Israel to mark the Foundation’s ten year anniversary. Next month I will offer some thoughts on transitions occurring at the Foundation as we welcome in the new year. Bookended by these two substantial themes, one might think the August blog would be a “light read.” Thankfully, that’s not the case, primarily because of intensive work that Jim Joseph Foundation grantees do during critical summer months. I am heartened by the thoughtful ways Jewish education organizations utilize this time of year, recognizing the special learning opportunities summer presents for youth, for young adults, and for educators. In fact, summer is an ideal time for “teachers to become students.” Pardes held ...More

When Jewish Learning Meets Social Networks: A 21st Century Approach to Education

By on November 21st, 2012

Over recent decades, demographic reports on Jewish life have indicated declining numbers of young Jews choosing to opt into Jewish life. This phenomenon is especially notable among teens, college students and twenty-somethings. In response to these concerning trends, Jewish innovators across the country have developed a wide array of new programs and initiatives targeting these age cohorts. For those funders interested in supporting efforts with the potential to reverse the demographic trends, a persistent challenge is to identify strategies that provide both breadth and depth. At the Jim Joseph Foundation, we are following the progress of a number of efforts designed to address this very issue. Three specific models – implemented by Hillel, Moishe House, and Jewish Student Connection (formerly Jewish ...More

The Jim Joseph Foundation invests in promising Jewish education grant initiatives. We partner with effective organizations that seek to inspire young people to discover the joy of living vibrant Jewish lives.